New Landscape Painting In Red and Green


I just finished a new painting, the shape is kind of cool because it’s long and thin, measuring 10×30 inches. The red and green in this painting are really vibrant and there is a subtle texture that picked up some of the running colours adding more texture and interest.

I really love this colour combination and lately have wanted to repaint my living room. I’m not sure yet but this red is really calling to me. We have black/brown pine floors and the current colour is butter yellow. But this red, on at least one or two walls would be incredibly rich and vibrant.

Before we had yellow walls and the black/brown floors I had two of the walls painted black against a caramel coloured floor. Black seems extreme but it actually worked really well. I have so much art on my walls that ends up covering a lot of any colour, which helps tone it down considerably. The funny thing about the black walls was that I had meant to paint them a dark olive green. I had almost finished when my oldest son came home and asked why I was painting the living room black. I argued with him for about five minutes that it was a dark olive green and only looked black in the lighting. Turns out I had grabbed the wrong paint can and ended up painting the room with exterior black paint. But it really did look unique and all the art looked amazing against the black so I lived with it for a few years.

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House On The Ridge 10×30 inches available for sale on Ugallery

 

Featured Artist – Meghan Deinhard – An Interview About Her Love Of Life And It’s Joyous Adventure


Today’s featured artists name is Meghan Deinhard, she’s a quirky and fun loving photographer and artist who sees beauty everywhere and believes “life is a joyous adventure”. With that kind of mindset who can help but be inspired by Meghan and her amazing artwork.

Here is her interview.

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How long have you been an artist?

 

I’ve been a fine artist for about 20 years, I got my BFA degree in 1995, but I consider I did “art” before that.  I was an actress and costume designer in my teens, 20’s and 30’s.   

 

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Where do you find your inspiration?

 

I get my inspiration from the world around me.  Everyday moments.  I am a very visual person and when something strikes me as interesting or humorous or marvelously beautiful I take a photo (or zillions) of it.  That’s one part of the inspiration.  The other comes from inside me when I am creating on the computer or in a studio.  I play… with ideas, color, texture, light, shadow, positive and negative space… whatever seems visually exciting to me in that moment. 

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What are you working on right now?

 

I’ve been going in an abstract direction lately.  I take one of my photographs and goof around with it in Photoshop Elements.  I am no pro at PSE, but learn something new every time I do a project.  It’s a blast!  I find a photo that wasn’t very successful on its own and see if I can transform it into something filled with color and texture.  Often you can’t even see the original image when I’m finished.  It’s like an adventure of discovery.  The other thing I’m excited about is my new blog… it’s not just about art, but about finding happy moments.

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What obstacles have you faced in your career as an artist and how did you overcome them?

 

I didn’t believe in myself or my artistic abilities enough to try to make and sell my art, or earlier in my life become a professional actress.  I think artists are very vulnerable and I had a lot of knocks when I was young.  It has taken me years to trust that I am a pretty great person and it doesn’t really matter if others don’t like my art, because I do!  It makes me happy to make it and happy to look at it.  As for how I overcame this?  Lots of self help books and meds… just kidding, sort of.  I do take meds for bipolar disorder, and I’ve done a lot of inner work.  But I think what it boils down to is trusting that life is good, and we are born to thrive and express our own unique energies.

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What is your favorite subject matter?

 

My first thought is nature.  Mother Nature is the ultimate artist and an endless source of inspiration.  But, I think what really informs my art is the interaction of me with my daily environment.  In 2011 I carried a camera with me everywhere I went. Each day I took at least one photo and posted the best reflection of that day on Facebook with a unique and descriptive caption. I now have a fascinating visual autobiography of my year.  What I learned is that life itself, inner and outer, is art; and hidden within every moment is a miracle… you just have to pay attention and look for it.  Then as artists we make those moments visual… or as writers, verbal…  I guarantee you there were only a fraction of images I posted that year that are “saleable”, but the true artwork was the story the year of images and captions told.  People watched me go through the death of a cat, finding a new kitten, online dating, finding the love of my life and getting engaged to be married. 

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Besides your art what else are you passionate about?

 

Riding on the back of a motorcycle with my new husband!  And enjoying his ranch in McCall, ID where we go during the summer (we were married in a magical glen on the property last July). 

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Do you have any tips or insights you would pass on to an emerging artist?

 

Don’t compare your work to anyone else’s!   I never thought I could be an artist because I can’t draw well.  Pfft…  silly me.  Here I am now with a degree in ceramics and a burgeoning portfolio of photographs and abstract digital images.   Just keep doing art and try not to judge it.  It’s one thing to toss out something that doesn’t work, but constantly criticizing your work is a shame.  Beauty is truly in the eye of the beholder… and if nothing else, if it makes YOU happy, you’ve added joy to the world.   

Oh and if you are a digital or photographic artist…. back up often on an external hard drive!  😉

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Blog:  http://firebonnet.com

Art Gallery:  http://firebonnet.artistwebsites.com/index.html

All of my other social media connections can be made from either of these places. 

Art Prints Made From My Original Paintings


Art Prints Made From My Original Paintings

I’ve been working hard editing and adding style to some of my art prints so I can offer them for sale on fine art america. There are some really unique prints available on canvas, paper, acrylic or even framed. There are plenty of decorative art and abstract art prints for your home decor. Click the highlighted link “art prints made from my original paintings” to check it out!!

Tips For Hanging and Fitting Artwork Into Your Home Decor and Decorating Scheme


In general, artwork should be hung so that the center point of the picture or grouping is at about eye level for the average person. While this won’t be possible in every situation, it’s a good guideline to keep in mind.
Another technique to remember is that a grouping of pictures should be thought of as one unit. Test an arrangement of pictures by laying everything out on a large table (or on the floor), playing with combinations until you hit upon one that works. Laying them out on paper is even better since you’ll be able to trace around each object and determine where picture hangers should be installed. Tape the paper up on the wall as a template for picture hangers and you’ll be done in no time.

 

You can also lay out pieces of scrap molding (or tape) onto the floor to form the “outside” bundaries of a picture grouping — the measurements within which the smaller pieces of art will be set. This is useful when a particular wall has certain boundaries that must be observed (such as a chair rail, windows, heating vents, and the like) and helps keep your arrangement the proper size.
Choose smaller pictures for narrow walls and larger works for big wall spaces.
In general, when hanging art over a piece of furniture it should not be longer than the width of the furniture.
Choose artwork that underscores the mood or theme of your room’s decor.
Is the room vibrant, pastel, or neutral? Is your furniture casual, formal, modern, or traditional? These are clues that will help zero in on the type of artwork that compliments the color and scale of a room. Vibrant colors bring excitement to a room while neutral colors are more calming. Which do you prefer?
Keep in mind that one large painting makes a statement and keeps things simple. It can also call attention to the focal point of the room which is often the fireplace.
Landscape art is one good way to visually open up a smaller space. The view of a distant horizon acts as a sort of “window” giving the impression of a faraway vista. You can add the look of a “window” to a small or windowless area by hanging landscape art.
The use of line is sometimes overlooked by home decorators, yet proper use of line can set the mood in a room. Horizontal lines tend to elongate, widen, and emphasize a casual decorating scheme. Vertical lines however, tend to be more formal, add to the illusion of height, and can seem more elegant and refined.
You can find these and many more interesting tips on decorating your home with art by following the link to about.com-interior decorating.

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Advice For Custom Framing Your Artwork Or Collectables


Advice for custom framing your new piece of art or collectable item.  All of the paintings I offer for sale are ready to hang with painted sides on gallery wrapped canvas (meaning no staples showing). However if you choose to frame your new artwork here is some free advice. First off find a reputable, fully insured framer, if possible one that works out of a store. They can provide more frame choices and they are kept informed of the current trends and conservation techniques. Once you find a good framer you should find yourself using them for any repeat business. They will begin to understand your taste and budget and be able to choose colours and styles that will suit your home decor. The framing of artwork is meant to enhance the piece not take your eyes away from the art itself. A good frame choice is one that compliments the painting, may add a little interest while helping to draw your eye back into the painting. One mistake many people make is in choosing the width of the framing. Your eye tends to be drawn to the frame if it is out of porportion with the artwork. While it may be hard to visualize the final outcome with only a corner sample to view, trusting your framers advice will prove to be both economical (mistakes averted) as well as visually appealling.Entrapment